PRESS RELEASES
American Martial Arts Institute News, Testing Results, and Special Events

New Certified Instructor
Dr. Peter Hotvedt
April 8, 2017

In the American Martial Arts Institute, it takes years of training and dedication to earn the rank of black belt. For each student the challenges along the path are different. In the end, black belts in American Eagle Style have achieved a high standard of mental maturity and knowledge and an incredible range of physical skills. This rank would not have been possible without the guidance of instructors who have the ability to pass on the style.

The traditional martial arts embody the philosophical concept of the circle. Students one day teach what they have learned to another generation, giving back what was once given to them. This is no small feat. The ability to demonstrate the physical skills of a style does not mean that a black belt can teach those skills to another. For each student the challenges along the path are different. An instructor must take into consideration your level of self-confidence, body structure, age, and a multitude of other factors. They must be able to adapt their language, body posture, and instructional techniques to articulate a concept without changing the essence of that concept. Therefore, instructors in the American Martial Arts Institute are required to undergo an apprenticeship during which they are taught how to teach the style. Also, instructors must annually be recertified to teach.

The future of a style depends on new generations of students completing the circle and joining the instructor status. This growth produces a new individual with the traditional foundation of the style under the direction of the Grandmaster.

Students who are black belts and 18 years of age or older may request to be a staff member. If accepted, they enter into an apprenticeship. After several months of teaching, attending staff meetings, testings, and other school events, one individual has earned instructor status. Once an instructor, all instructors maintain their training, keep in constant contact with the Grandmaster, and continue to improve their instructional skills. They must be recertifed to teach, annually.

The American Martial Arts Institute is proud to announce that Grandmaster Crandall has awarded Dr. Peter Hotvedt with instructor status. Congratulations to Dr. Hotvedt and his instructor, Master Chuff.

If you are an adult black belt interested in learning more about becoming a staff member, and possibly one day instructor, speak with your instructor or Grandmaster Crandall for more information.